A Week In Hell

A Week In Hell

Nathan Stacy, M2, Class of 2022

 My momma was recently diagnosed with cancer of her jaw. She underwent something called a “Flap Surgery”, which removed part of her jaw and replaced it with her leg bone. These are some of my reflections about the experience my family went through during this trying time. I wrote some during this time period, and some afterwards, so the past-tense/present-tense jumps around a little bit.

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Schrödinger’s Residency Application: Reflecting on My Life as a Student

Schrödinger’s Residency Application: Reflecting on My Life as a Student

Daniel Ortiz, M4, Class of 2020

Two interviews in and I feel like I’m saying too much and getting it all wrong. They’re going to hate my scores. What if they don’t like my answers? Why am I so anxious? I just want this to be the right place for me. This might sound like that time we all applied to medical school, but I’m referring to residency interviews as a fourth-year medical student.

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Caps for Sale

Caps for Sale

David Embers – Class of 2020


Four-year-old David was a simple guy. He loved to eat, he loved to argue, but most of all, he loved to wear hats. He loved cowboy hats, baseball hats, and party hats. Any kind of hat. An odd obsession for sure, especially when his head was so egregiously large. Regardless, it was his first love. His favorite book to read at bedtime was Caps for Sale, a children’s book detailing the life of a cap peddler who was unique in that he wore all the hats he had for sale on his own head. My mom and dad must have read me that book a thousand times. I can still recite entire pages from memory. I spent hours thinking about how happy that hat salesman must have been. Considering its intended audience was pre-kindergarten, the book’s author likely did not anticipate impacting a reader so deeply, but that’s an issue to take up with pudgy, argumentative, cap wearing four-year-old David. How frustrating must it be to be my parents? You pick out some random book at the bookstore hoping your kid will fall asleep by page four like he does every other book. Instead, he forces you to re-read it over and over again. And then, the next day, when you need help putting away dishes, he’s standing there eating his eighth popsicle, daydreaming about how many hats he can balance on his head. Whatever my parents got paid to put up with me, it wasn’t enough. And yet, as it stands today, some twenty years later, I’m still thinking about that book. Popsicle in hand, I’m still thinking about what it really means to wear all the hats.

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Farmland

Farmland
Nathan Stacy, M2, Class of 2022

My fiancé’s Grandpa is a man you won’t easily forget. He commands a room. A natural born storyteller, with 80 years of experience spinning yarns, he can paint a vivid picture that completely draws you in, in a heartbeat.

He was spinning one of his yarns to me as we took his 4-wheeler (the Gator) to tour his farm fields. Continue reading “Farmland”

Reach for the Moon, End up a Fleming

Reach for the Moon, End up a Fleming
David Embers, M4, Class of 2020

I remember 4th grade like it was yesterday, likely because that is when I peaked. It could have been a fun year, but unfortunately for me, it wasn’t. You see, my podmates all had cooties. You read that right, ALL of my podmates. It was me and three girls: Brooke, Sasha, and Rebecca. All confirmed cooties. What a joke. In hindsight, Mrs. Stevenson did it on purpose because she knew me and my best friend Josh were tight as heck and could have basically taught the class if we wanted to. But whatever.

Anyway, at the front of the room above the chalkboard was a poster. “Reach for the moon, and even if you miss, you’ll land amongst the stars.” It was catchy. No lie, the first few times I read that it gave me goosebumps. Thought I might just mess around and change the world. Made me want to be extra precise on the folds for my construction paper popper that would inevitably get taken away before recess. Made me want to be somebody.

Now, looking back, I laugh at 4th grade David. In fact, I want to slap him in the back of the head. Continue reading “Reach for the Moon, End up a Fleming”

Advice For the First Years

Advice For the First Years

In the All-Knowing Wisdom of the M2-M4’s, we’ve put together a compilation of little pieces of advice for the newbies.

“Don’t treat medical school like a race. Treat it like a marathon. Place as high as you can manage, but once you cross the finish line nobody can take that accomplishment away from you.” — Daniel Ortiz, Class of 2020

“ALWAYS have a jacket. The HEB is colder than Antarctica.”– Anonymous, Class of 2021

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Miracle-Gro

Miracle-Gro

 

QeeQee Gao, M2, Class of 2022

As the end of my first year draws near and the sweet taste of summer looms ahead, I am anticipating a confrontation that I have been pushing away for months. For the majority of my first year, I have been battling with a creeping sensation of … nothingness: a null that which I had hoped was joy, an emptiness that which I had hoped was fulfillment, and a void that which I had hoped was curiosity.

Am I happy? Am I enjoying? Am I fulfilled?

No.

No..

No…

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More Than Just a Number

More Than Just a Number
Daniel Ortiz, M4, Class of 2020

You are more than just a number.

But of course, you already knew that… right? Unfortunately, the reality is harrowing. Throughout our curriculum and challenging gauntlet of test after test, we discover that complex clinical reasoning is not submissive to the 3-digit score engraved onto our transcript for residency directors to see. Continue reading “More Than Just a Number”